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Easton

Easton

Male / 3 years & 6 months

Share the first part of Easton's story for readers on Sleuth! When and why did you start to feel concerned?

Easton's story started before he was born. At about 28 weeks pregnant, I found myself very sick in the ICU with an infection, pneumonia, and relentless fevers. At the time I was blissfully unaware of what cytomegalovirus (CMV) was. However after weeks of testing, I was diagnosis with CMV and told that there was a chance that my child would be born with a congenital form of CMV as it could pass through the placenta. However, I was told to not worry and that it was unlikely to cause issues. This was far from true for us and so many. A few months later, Easton was born! At 36 weeks and 5lbs, he was doing well but had issues from the get go. He did test positive for CMV at birth but I was again reassured that he would be fine, and there was nothing to do for it. He was jaundice at birth and didn't as eat much as I felt he should. Every time he ate he would spill so much milk around his mouth that it soaked his shirt and mine. He sounded like he was gargling milk when he drank, almost like he was drowning. It was so concerning to me, but it was brushed off by doctors very frequently. I took him to his pediatrician, lactation consultants, chiropractors... I was desperate for help, He cried all the time, slept restlessly, and developed thrush. He was diagnosed failure to thrive at two months old weighing just 6lbs 7oz. This is when we were able to move to a larger children's hospital and start on this journey!

K Bear

K Bear

Male / 2 years & 1 month

Share the first part of K Bear's story for readers on Sleuth! When and why did you start to feel concerned?

When K Bear was 6 months old we took him to a Christmas party with lots of similar aged babies. They were all rolling and some were even trying to crawl. I felt alarm bells ringing but friends and family reassured me that boys take longer to develop and that K Bear was just lazy but we felt uneasy. We put the delayed development down to lack of sleep and almost zero time spend doing tummy time as he’d just scream. At his 9 month check-up, the paediatrician was concerned that he rarely rolled and still couldn’t sit unsupported. He recommended physiotherapy and reassured us K Bear would only need two or three sessions. Now looking back at photos before this check-up, K Bear was starting to sit unassisted but had slowly lost the ability in the run up to spasms starting. He’s also not smiling in most of the photos around that time which we now know are tell-tale signs of IS. A few days after this appointment K Bear made a strange movement, a little like he was losing his balance and putting his arms and legs out to steady himself. His arms and legs would fling outwards like he was falling forwards. He had an ear infection at the time so I thought it was due to that, however, I sent an email to the paediatrician describing the movement the best I could. He told me not to worry and that it sounded like a normal baby movement. A couple of weeks went by and K Bear was still doing this strange movement a few times a day. We had started referring to it as ‘jumping’ or ‘falling’. My father-in-law was very concerned when he saw it, but I told him the paediatrician said it was normal. He wasn’t convinced. We finally got footage of the spasms and sent it to the paediatrician on a Saturday, two and a half weeks after we first saw one. He replied later that day which we thought was strange as it was the weekend. He told us he’d forwarded it to a neurologist and the lump in our stomachs expanded. We were terrified.

Seizures observed at 0 years & 9 months

LuckyJoJo

LuckyJoJo

Female / 6 months

Share the first part of LuckyJoJo's story for readers on Sleuth! When and why did you start to feel concerned?

Lucky started experiencing infantile spasms about 2 months ago, when she was just 3.5 months old. They were subtle movements that I only caught because 1. She is our first baby- so we stare at her all the time and 2. It was happening in a cluster. Prior to these spasms, Lucky seemed to be slow in reaching milestones (although she was still very young), but was healthy.

Seizures observed at 0 years & 3 months

Y

YonasB

Male / 9 years & 1 month

Share the first part of YonasB's story for readers on Sleuth! When and why did you start to feel concerned?

No answer added.

Seizures observed

R

RosieSue

Female / 3 years & 9 months

Share the first part of RosieSue's story for readers on Sleuth! When and why did you start to feel concerned?

She couldn’t hold her head up till after a year old. She was very far behind her twin brother who was hitting milestones right on time or early. She was a floppy baby. She couldn’t coordinate suck swallow and breathe. She barely ever cried or made noise. Didn’t start babbling till over a year old.

Seizures observed at 0 years & 0 months

Ellie

Ellie

Female / 21 years & 6 months

Share the first part of Ellie's story for readers on Sleuth! When and why did you start to feel concerned?

Ellie has been a healthy 8 months old. Two days ago, at night, she had just come home from daycare and was sitting when she had three periods of shaking for a few seconds. She remained sitting up and seemed to be aware but she did poop and spit up during the shaking.

Seizures observed at 0 years & 8 months

T.

T.

Female / 29 years & 1 month

Share the first part of T.'s story for readers on Sleuth! When and why did you start to feel concerned?

My younger daughter, T. , would go to a birthday party - which she hated to do, because she was so anxious - and come back and tell you in detail the colors of every girl’s dress. For 10 girls, she would tell you what they wore, what the pattern was, what the color scheme was. Then, you would sit down with her and say, “This is the letter ‘A’” in a book and, on the next page, “This is the letter ‘A’”. You would then turn the page again, and point to an “A,” and say, “What is this?” And she would say, “I don’t know.” We benefited from birth order. Having an older daughter served as a point of reference, developmentally. My older daughter did things very early, but even accounting for that, I noticed disparities. The other reason T. hated going to the birthday party was because she didn’t like the social dynamics. She said, “Well, if I go, then this girl feels left out.” She had lots of emotional intelligence. I first started noticing T.’s learning differences at about three-and-a-half or four, and she didn't learn to read till she was about eight or nine. I learned more in hindsight. If you look, you also see this anxiety in children like T. Some of that may be her personality, but in my experience observing T. and other kids with learning differences, they felt like they weren’t meeting some sense of expectations. And that feeling created anxiety. In preschool, it was fine. But then, in PS6, it was hard for T. because there was constantly this sense of external benchmarks. Carmen Fariña, who became the Chancellor of New York City Schools, was the principal of PS6 at the time. I am eternally loyal to her. She put a cluster of kids together with teachers who were veterans and really knew what they're doing. They provided T. with a resource room teacher who was on the board of the National Dyslexia Foundation and taught at Hunter. In New York City, it's not like you're out at play all the time, and have other ways of expressing your capabilities. In spite of their efforts, school is pretty constrained. Certain places like PS6 were academically focused. I think this leads to an emotional toll. But I will tell you: when I go and read the assessment they did of T. at the age of five, everything is still true in her adult life. It was brilliant. They identified her issues with pattern recognition and sequencing. Now, T.’s a web developer, and she lives in Austin. One of her biggest struggles is: “Oh my, there's 10 projects to handle. What do I do first?” That problem of prioritizing tasks. At the age of 28, every once in a while, she still calls me up and goes, “Okay, I just need a little help. What should I do first?” I expect (and hope) she'll do that as long as I'm alive.

febrile seizures observed at 0 years & 1 month

S.

S.

Male / 4 years & 8 months

Share the first part of S.'s story for readers on Sleuth! When and why did you start to feel concerned?

Our son (nicknamed S.) is an interesting case. If you were to ever see him, you might think he was two years old, not his actual age of three-and-a-half. Not only does he model some immature behaviors, though he's well-behaved, but he's very small for his age. He wears size-two clothes still. He is getting a little taller, and he eats like a horse. But he just stays very thin. He’s not even 30 pounds. He has a little sister who is 10 months old who is catching up to him in weight. She's close to 20 pounds. She’s right around the 50th percentile for everything. He's still around 4%. On his growth chart, he has been less than the 5th percentile his whole life. And then speech-wise, he's actually more like a nine month old (not a three-and-a-half year old). For whatever reason, again, we can't figure it out. His expressive delay is huge and he does not talk. I would say that what he understands is a lot closer to a match for his physical size (of 2 years old). If we say “Hey, slow down,” if we're outside walking around, and he gets a little too far ahead, he'll slow down. If we say, “Okay, we're about to cross the street. We’ve got to hold hands,” he puts his hands up. He knows we're going to cross. If I say, “Alright, you’ve got to sit down in your chair.” Then, instead of standing up, he sits down. But he can’t talk. He's so small physically, and that has got to be holding him back in some way. I'm probably wrong, but I feel like that in my heart. Our son was born with a couple of strikes against him. His mother had a two-vessel cord during the pregnancy . He was basically always very, very tiny, through the entire process. To the point where we even got geneticists involved. And they were telling us it could be some kind of skeletal dysplasia. It could be this. It could be that. They were telling us a number of things that it could possibly be. When S. was born, he was supposed to go naturally. We ended up trying to induce early. I think it was three-and-a-half weeks early. That didn't work, so they did a caesarean. When we went home from the hospital, he was actually below five pounds. Then, right away, he had an inguinal hernia, so he went through surgery. As well as that, he had digestive issues. He was allergic to milk. It took us a little while to figure out what was going on. As he grew, we noticed that he wasn't hitting a lot of his milestones, whether it was movement, or speech, or others. He finally started crawling around a year old but he was not very good at it. And he didn't walk independently until he was just about two. We started to notice when he wasn't developing language. He also has a little bit of a lazy eye, which I think is genetic. I had the same thing when I was a child. These were all little things that we knew were somehow contributing to what was happening. Those were our first indications when we started to put together these puzzle pieces.

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